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Accumulo >> mail # dev >> [DISCUSS] Accumulo Bylaws


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Re: [DISCUSS] Accumulo Bylaws
I think my suggestions of clarifications for committer and PMC member
responsibilities earlier in this thread might have been overlooked, so I'll
repeat them.  Also, I have a slight preference for not using business days
for vote lengths since not all of our voters do this as their day job.

Committers: Under the terms of the Contributor License Agreement that all
committers must sign, a committer's primary responsibility is to ensure
that all code committed to Apache Accumulo is licensed appropriately and
meets those criteria set forth in the CLA (including both original works
and patches committed on behalf of other contributors).

PMC members: The function of the PMC is to vote on community-related
decisions, such as on new PMC members, committers and on releases.  In
particular, PMC members must understand both our project's criteria and ASF
criteria for voting on a release (http://www.apache.org/dev/release.html,
http://www.apache.org/dev/release.html#what,
http://www.apache.org/dev/release.html#what-must-every-release-contain,
http://www.apache.org/dev/release.html#approving-a-release).

The following two paragraphs may also be useful (copied from
http://apache.org/foundation/how-it-works.html#pmc):

The role of the PMC from a Foundation perspective is oversight. The main
role of the PMC is not code and not coding - but to ensure that all legal
issues are addressed, that procedure is followed, and that each and every
release is the product of the community as a whole. That is key to our
litigation protection mechanisms.

Secondly the role of the PMC is to further the long term development and
health of the community as a whole, and to ensure that balanced and wide
scale peer review and collaboration does happen. Within the ASF we worry
about any community which centers around a few individuals who are working
virtually uncontested. We believe that this is detrimental to quality,
stability, and robustness of both code and long term social structures.

On Wed, Mar 5, 2014 at 9:14 AM, Bill Havanki <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>wrote: